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The domestic high-speed line Alfa Pendular connects Braga, Porto and Coimbra with Lisbon from the north and Faro from the south. Prices between the major cities starts at €40 in second class. All trains call at Oriente, only some in Apolonia.
Lisbon can be accessed from six main highways. Coming from the south (A2) or east (A6 – the main route from Madrid), there are the two bridges:
From/to south: The A2 goes all the way to the 25 de Abril bridge, which usually has lots of traffic getting into Lisbon, especially on weekday mornings. This is the best option if you want to go to the center of Lisbon or to the west (A5 – Estoril, Cascais, Sintra).
To north / to east: If you branch from the A2 into the A12, you’ll get to the Vasco da Gama bridge, the longest bridge in Europe, it usually has less traffic than the older 25 de Abril bridge (but a more expensive toll). This is the best option to go to the eastern/northern section of Lisbon (to the airport and to the Parque das Nacoes – the former Expo 98 site), and also to take the A1 or A8 going north.
From/to north and the airport: Coming from the north, there is the A1, that connects Lisbon to Santarem, Fatima, Leiria, Coimbra, Aveiro, Porto. The A1 ends near the airport. There’s also the A8, which goes to Torres Vedras, Caldas da Rainha, Alcobaca, Leiria.
From the west , there is the A5, which connects to Estoril, Cascais, and the IC19 that crosses all the suburbs and ends near Sintra.
Lisbon has three ring roads: The 2? circular, which connects the A1 to the IC19; the CRIL IC17 (still incomplete), which connects the Vasco da Gama bridge with the A1 and A8; and the CREL A9, which connects the A1 with the A8, IC19, A5, and goes all the way to the Estoril coast.
All nearby cities and most major cities in Portugal have direct buses to Lisbon. The main bus terminal is at Sete Rios (metro: Jardim Zoologico). The main operator for long-course buses is Rede Nacional de Expressos [113]
if you want to go around the city in a easy way you can use the bus of Carris [114].
You can get a boat to Lisbon from the following stations: Barreiro; Trafaria; Montijo; and Cacilhas. It’s an excellent sightseeing opportunity crossing the river Tagus to Lisbon.
Many cruise ships dock at several places along the river on the Lisbon side, with variably good access to public transport throughout the city. Many lines offer shuttles to key points nearby.
From airport: Due to the relative proximity of Lisbon’s airport to the city center, it is quite easy to cycle from the airport to the center, and could be recommended if you arrive for a cycling trip.
After leaving the airport and negotiating a roundabout, merge onto the long and straight dual-carriageway Av. Almirante Gago Coutinho (you should be able just to follow the “Centro” (“Downtown”) signs.) After merging, the route to Baixa is simple and straight. This street later turns into Av. Almirante Reis, and then Rua de Palma, at the end of which you will be right in Baixa.
Cycling outside Lisbon can be a challenge, as Lisbon offers far easier cycling than what you may find outside of the city. The further you get from Lisbon however, the easier the cycling gets. You may wish to take advantage of certain regional trains that take bicycles in a separate luggage carriage, allowing you to start your cycling some 50 or 100km outside of the city.
More below at Getting around by bicycle.
Metro and Buses Edit.
Lisbon has a very efficient public transport network that covers the entire city in addition to the surrounding areas. Lisbon’s recently refurbished metro system is clean, quick, and efficient. While metro announcements are made only in Portuguese, signs and ticketing machines are generally bilingual in Portuguese and English.
The extensive bus and electrico ( tram ) network is run by Carris.
The best and, in many cases, the sole way to pay for city transport is buying a rechargeable green-coloured card 7 Colinas ( Viva Viagem ). It’s valid for metro, trams ( electrico ), urban trains, most buses and ferries.
The exception is buses not run by Carris—other bus companies have their own tickets. The card itself can be purchased for €0.50 (this price doesn’t include any trips—add as many trips as you want), and remains valid for a year.
The Viva Viagem card can be charged in three different modes . You choose the mode when you charge the card. For example, you can choose the “single ticket” mode, and put €1.40 on a card (the machine will give change), and ride the tram to your hotel. Next day you wake up, and put €6.15 on the same card and choose the Day pass mode, making your card “Day pass” now. (Be aware that by using the CP (green colored) terminals the day pass ticket is ONLY valid for the trains – which costs 6€;for the Metro/Tram/Busses look for a Carris terminal: here a day pass costs 6.15€) The modes are as follows:
Single tickets for bus (€1.40; €1.80 if bought on the bus) or metro (€1.40). You put this exact amount on this card. Unlike Zapping mode, this ticket allows free transfers within one hour. Day pass for metro and buses (€6.15) Zapping . This is a ‘stored value’ mode, similar to the Oyster card in London. The rates are also cheaper comparing to single ride: every journey costs €1.25, but the transfers are not free – although you get a small discount for two contiguous journeys, e.g., if you change from metro to bus. If you have a bit of unused money, it is wise to go to the ticket desk and there they do zapping for any amount. This way you can fully utilize your money on the card before going back to your country. You won’t be able to get the refund, so make sure you don’t put way more than you intend to spend.

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